Loading…
NTD has ended

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Wednesday, June 3
 

09:00 EEST

Android Application Security Testing
As of September 2017, the Google Play store holds 3.3 million applications.
In May 2017 Google announced that there are over 2 billion monthly active
Android devices. These devices are a gateway to our entire lives- our contacts,
communications, entertainment and finances. Every application installed on a
mobile device is placed into an ecosystem where all of this information is stored
and constantly exchanged and accessed by the user and other parties. And
just like every other piece of software written by humans, Android applications
contain vulnerabilities. These vulnerabilities can be exploited by attackers,
placing users and publishers of applications at risk.

What we will do:

The workshop will be a combination of lectures, demos and hands on exercises, during which you will be given access to virtualized Android devices with pre-installed applications designed to showcase specific vulnerabilities.

• We will conduct assessments on the applications, the devices and on
network traffic to discover the vulnerabilities present in the apps
• We will assess the threats posed by the vulnerabilities
• Since no security assessment is complete without writing a Proof-of-Concept
attack, we will exploit every vulnerability that we find during our assessments

We will use the following techniques to conduct our assessments:
• de-assembling applications into human readable dalvik opcodes(smali)
• generating Java-like code from Android apk files
• reverse engineering application logic, modifying and re-compiling Android
applications
• modifying Android application logic during run-time
• analyzing, intercepting and modifying Android application network traffic

Key takeaways:
After completing the workshop you will have a basic understanding of how to
conduct an Android application assessment. The outcome will be a healthy
paranoia, which will make you think twice before installing any application from
the Play Store in the future. At the very least, you will become conscious of
permissions requested by Android applications and how dangerous they may be.

Prerequisites:
This will be a technical, hands-on workshop, which means, that participants are
required to bring their own laptop.
Previous programming and command line experience may make your overall
experience smoother, but all concepts, techniques and tools will be explained
from A to Z. In conclusion- all you really need is a laptop and motivation!

Speakers
avatar for Marko Belzetski

Marko Belzetski

Penetration tester, Clarified Security
Marko is a certified GIAC Web Application Penetration Tester (GWAPT) and Mobile Device Security Analyst (GMOB). He has been a web and mobile application penetration tester at Clarified Security OÜ since August 2016. As a lifelong enthusiast and self-leaner, he enjoys experimenting... Read More →


Wednesday June 3, 2020 09:00 - 17:00 EEST
Puupakusaal

09:00 EEST

Complex Test Scenarios with Selenium, Java and Helper Libraries
Learning the Selenium framework for testing a website is just the beginning. Usually Selenium tests require more than just clicking on a button or reading data from a field. They involve generating the test data required and processing data read from the webpages. Writing the most efficient web tests, apart from Selenium, also require some Java concepts, for easily gathering data from the pages tests interact with. Generating test data to feed into the system through the website can also be done with either Java or some helping methods from Apache Commons. In this tutorial I will show examples that anyone could encounter in their daily work, and provide a solution to creating the most efficient tests. This can be done using some Java concepts like: Objects, Enums, Lists or HashMaps.

Three of the test scenarios I will tackle during this tutorial include:
- Fill in a registration form (with Selenium) with randomly generated test data (by Java and Apache Commons). Discuss what types of data are required for different fields (int, String, dates), how to randomly select values from dropdowns, and how to generate data based on already selected values.
- Read the information from a webpage (with Selenium), representing the data you submitted when filling in the registration form. Read them into corresponding data types. Check that this data is correct (using Java concepts).
- Interact with a video embedded in your page (with Selenium).

Key Takeaways:
  • Real situations which testers encounter. 
  • How to generate the needed data in the best way possible, in order to feed into the system via Selenium. 
  • How to gather all the required data from the websites, in order for it to have meaning and serve the testing purpose.
  • How to use different Java concepts to work with the websites (either for reading data from the sites or creating data to send to the backend from the sites).
  • How to be most efficient in writing Selenium tests in larger and more complex scenarios, in order to have nice and clean tests.
  • How to organize the code + design considerations.

Speakers
avatar for Corina-Adina Pip

Corina-Adina Pip

QA & Automation Lead, Splend
Corina is a Test & Automation Leading Expert, with focus on testing by means of Java, Selenium, TestNG, Spring, Maven, and other cool frameworks and tools. Previous endeavours from her 10+ years testing career include working on navigation devices and in the online gaming industry... Read More →


Wednesday June 3, 2020 09:00 - 17:00 EEST
D-Saal

09:00 EEST

Efficient Selenium Infrastructure with Selenoid
Selenoid is an alternative lightning fast open-source Selenium protocol implementation running browsers and Android emulators inside Docker containers. It is distributed with a set of ready-to-use Docker images corresponding to the majority of popular browser versions, has a one-command installation utility and works slightly more efficiently than traditional Selenium Grid.

This tutorial shows how to build efficient and scalable browser automation infrastructure using Selenoid and related tools. You will be taught why running browsers in containers is so efficient, how to easily install Selenoid and use its powerful features.

Part I. Using Selenoid for local automated tests development
1. Selenium: 10 mins of theory. Brief Selenium history. Current WebDriver architecture. How Selenoid works and its motivation
2. Selenoid installation for tests development. What is required to start Selenoid. Selenoid installation: possible ways to do this. Selenoid UI installation and quick review
3. Basic Selenoid features: Live automated tests debugging. Recording and downloading videos of tests being executed. Manual testing in Selenoid UI. Using custom screen resolution. Using custom test name
4. Updating browsers

Part II. Creating Selenium cluster
1. Selenium clusters theory. Why Selenium Grid is not suitable. Client-side load balancing. Server-side load-balancing. How to share state. Session ID magic Ggr server. How it works.
2. Setting up Ggr from scratch. Creating users file. Creating quota file. Starting Ggr. Running tests against Ggr.
3. Ggr Cluster Maintenance. Changing available browsers with no downtime. Adding users with no downtime. How to deal with multiple quota files. Proxying video, logs, downloaded files. Adding more Ggr instances. Health checking instances.
4. Ggr UI. How it works. Setting up and linking with Selenoid UI.

Part III. Advanced Selenoid features
1. Selenoid for Windows browsers. Possible ways to run Windows browsers with Selenoid. How to build a Docker image with Windows inside. Technical requirements of this approach.
2. Selenoid for Android platform. Android testing theory. How to build a Docker image with Android inside. Where to take ready to use Android image. Technical requirements of this approach.
3. Advanced browsers configuration file fields. Volumes Environment variables. Tmpfs Hosts entries. ShmSize.
4. Sending logs to centralized logs storage. Why? Centralized logging storages. How to configure Selenoid to send logs.
5. Sending statistics to centralized metrics storage/status. API Configuring. Telegraf to upload statistics. Creating statistics dashboard with Grafana.
6. Sending logs to centralized logs storage (ELK-stack). What is ELK stack? Configuring Selenoid to send logs to ELK-stack. Searching across logs.
7. Building custom browser images. What's inside browser image. Ready to use browser images. How to build custom image.

Key Takeaways:
  • Why Selenium should always be run in Docker containers. 
  • How to forget about Selenium issues with Selenoid.
  • How to efficiently scale Selenium cluster to easily have thousands of browsers running in parallel.
  • Where to take ready to use browser images and how to build your own.
  • How to use powerful browser tests debugging features in Selenoid. 

Speakers
avatar for Ivan Krutov

Ivan Krutov

Software Developer, Aerokube
Ivan has 10+ years of experience in Golang and Java development. He has maintained large-scale software testing infrastructure more than 6 years  and he is a core maintainer of Selenoid, Ggr, Moon and other Aerokube projects.


Wednesday June 3, 2020 09:00 - 17:00 EEST
Terrassisaal

09:00 EEST

Introduction to Accessibility Audits
When something works for everyone, it works better for everyone' Derek Featherstone.
By the end of this jammed packed session of learning, you will have accessibility feedback on your system, if reachable at the venue, or the information and knowledge you need to begin your own accessibility audit. This hands-on and interactive workshop will introduce the fundamentals of accessibility auditing with a focus on the latest Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. We will use the Accessibility Quadrants to help assess Readability, Inclusive Language, Usability and Compliance.

This introduction to accessibility as a testing discipline begins with a unique, fun and interactive accessibility quiz! It will continue working through each accessibility quadrant and the focus for each participant will be executing testing on their own websites or systems (if accessible) for immediate feedback to take back to work, or one similar if one can be found. With support from the instructor and the help of supplied checklists and free tools (plus other resources such as cheat sheets), each attendee will be able to gain practical experience of accessibility testing that can provide valuable feedback even before you return to the office. We will introduce and use a number of tools to help with testing and note their strengths and weaknesses. We will put our phones in accessibility mode and test apps and sites to gain an understanding of the different ways people interact online. We will use screen readers to assess how those with no or limited vision will experience our applications. We will introduce accessibility traits to user stories to understand it is not only people with disabilities that have access issues!

Don't forget to bring your phone, headphones, curiosity and thirst for learning.

Key Takeaways:
  • An understanding of the value accessibility adds to your applications and reputations
  • Why accessibility ≠ disability, it is more about inclusion
  • Practical accessibility testing experience
  • Practical mobile accessibility testing experience
  • An understanding of the Accessibility Quadrants
  • How to advocate for accessibility at work
  • Knowledge of tools, checklists and other resources to support accessibility testing
  • Practical arguments and information to advocate for accessibility testing in their companies

Speakers
avatar for Adrian Stokes

Adrian Stokes

Senior Test Analyst, Computershare
Adrian ‘Ady’ Stokes is a long-time accessibility advocate with over 20 years’ experience in Audit, Business Intelligence and Test roles. With a thirst for learning and continually improving he's always looking for ways to share information from his blog to a monthly newsletter... Read More →


Wednesday June 3, 2020 09:00 - 17:00 EEST
Väike Saal

09:00 EEST

Let's Make e2e Test Automation Great Again
"The web has evolved. Finally, testing has too." Test automation does not have to be complicated or require a programmer's skill set. Cypress is a tool for creating automated tests for web based applications and has made setting up and creating automated tests easily understandable even for people with no previous programming or automation experience.

This tutorial will be a full hands-on E2E automation training with Cypress for people interested in test automation, even without previous experience. We'll cover the process from setting up the project to using APIs to speed up our test runs. We'll make an introduction to CSS selectors and finding the locators with Chrome extension ChroPath. We'll have exercises to improve our test project step by step for everyone to understand what we do and why.

Key takeaways:
The attendees will learn:
1) How to set up a new automation project from scratch
2) How to build a fast, easy and flake free tests for different viewports
3) Cypress framework: architecture, graphical interface, core concepts, best practices etc 

Speakers
avatar for Kirta-Linda Karits

Kirta-Linda Karits

Test Engineer, Nekmit OÜ
Kirta is a Software Testing Consultant from Tallinn, Estonia. She started her automation journey with Selenium, but found quite quickly that flaky tests, heavy maintenance and unnecessarily complex architecture is a big price to pay. She believes that automation should be straight... Read More →
avatar for Erkko Kebbinau

Erkko Kebbinau

Senior Testing and Automation Engineer
Erkko has been a software tester since 2009 and from 2016 he is a senior tester at CGI. Besides testing he has performed in different roles including documenting, test automation, programming, web page administration, test server administration, customer support, JIRA/Confluence administrator... Read More →


Wednesday June 3, 2020 09:00 - 17:00 EEST
Suur Traforuum

09:00 EEST

Python (Not Only) for Testers
Based on 2018 data Python the fastest growing programming language in the world. It doesn’t matter if you look at the number of contributors, stack-overflow threads or opened job positions – Python is in most cases at the top. What’s very important, it’s also the fastest-growing language for test automation purposes.
I will teach you what he learned during his professional (but not only!) career. He will pass you the knowledge of all good practices as well as all tips & tricks to build your delightful test automation environment.

During the workshop, you will understand everything needed to start your Pythonic adventure from scratch. You’ll see how to use PyCharm IDE in an easy and comfortable way, how to build and maintain development environments and handle packages and libraries. After that smooth start, you’ll be solving simple programming problems to learn Python basics, including functions, conditions, loops, classes, collections, and exceptions.
After we pass that part, you’ll be involved in what the testers like the most: finding bugs by writing code! Balancing between dev and test roles we'll prepare fully functional code.
As the last step, you will have a chance to wear your everyday tester's hat to prepare, write and execute automated test cases.

Pre-Requisites:
- Bring a laptop and a power cable!
- PyCharm
- Python 3.8

Key Takeaways:
  • Learning how to set-up environment and navigate in PyCharm IDE
  • Understanding Python project structure and dependencies
  • Know-how about Python basics (functions, classes, methods, collections and exceptions)
  • Writing and debugging tests using Python modules (py.test/unittest)
  • Understanding value of good practices and patterns for coding in test automation 

Speakers
avatar for Dawid Pacia

Dawid Pacia

Test Automation Manager, Brainly
Dawid is a 1/3 QA, 1/3 DevOps, 1/3 Lead. Tech freak following all the newest technologies (and implementing then on his own). Fan of Agile approach to project management and products. Awarded as "People of Testing” 2018 & 2019.What do I do?Leading and supporting the best and the... Read More →


Wednesday June 3, 2020 09:00 - 17:00 EEST
Vahetänavasaal

09:00 EEST

The Path to Leadership
The Leadership role is often seen as a natural position to move into once you get to a certain point in your career. But what happens after you enter into that role? In this tutorial, you’ll get to draw from the experiences of leaders with different perspectives - one with 20 years of experience learned mostly through trial and error and another who is fairly new to their leadership role and has applied a more structured approach. After becoming a leader, it is assumed that you know what you are doing. Why wouldn’t it be? You sought out that position and you accepted the offer! When it comes to leadership, there is no one size fits all course or book. As a result, a lot of leaders learn by trial and error with little support. It takes time and dedication to develop your style.

Through practical activities such as providing feedback, conflict resolution and active listening, this workshop will explore ideas and skills to enable you to launch your leadership journey! Participants can expect a range of hands-on activities practicing active listening, asking open questions in order to perform a coaching role and identifying and applying your values and principals. You’ll also get to hear some real-life stories and lessons learned by the facilitators, as well as an ‘Ask Me Anything’ (AMA) session.

Key takeaways:
  • Identify the tools needed to transition to a leadership role.
  • Understand how leadership skills such as conflict resolution and providing feedback assist new leaders.
  • Apply these new skills to build relationships through coaching and clear communication.

Speakers
avatar for Ali Hill

Ali Hill

QA and Continuous Delivery Consultant, ECS Digital
Ali is a Test Consultant who has recently moved into a leadership and management role. He has always been fascinated by the people side of building great software and enjoys reviewing the processes that people use to do this. Co-organiser of the Ministry of Testing and DevOps Playground... Read More →
avatar for Shey Crompton

Shey Crompton

Director, Crompton Consulting
Shey is an independent Software Tester with 20 years experience in many areas of software development. Recently, he has been working with large enterprises in order to help them transform themselves to be more modern, agile, competitive within their industries. When he is not talking... Read More →


Wednesday June 3, 2020 09:00 - 17:00 EEST
Väike Traforuum
 
Thursday, June 4
 

09:00 EEST

OPENING KEYNOTE - Passion Driven Testing
Functional testing is often one of the first jobs in one's IT-career and often not for a very long time.

While preparing for this talk, I have interviewed people with really different experiences in functional testing. I have analyzed their feedback and reflected my own ideas with following questions: Why did they start with testing? What kept them doing functional testing? How long do they plan to do it? Why did they change it to other jobs?

There were clear patterns in answers for those questions. Those are motivation, importance of getting feedback, importance of feeling involved and needed in the project, what causes routine and why it may get boring.

The solutions, ideas or answers to some of raised questions and problems can be obvious and at the same time crucial. I would not mind if someone could share the answers with me at the beginning of my IT-career, yet I had to find my own answers.

Now it's time for me to share my experience and ideas and draw a parallel to security testing field:
  • How to use curiosity and passion while testing. How to keep testing interesting
  • What is the attitude difference between security testing and functional testing
  • Which of your reported functional bugs are actually security holes - spiced up with hacking demos.

Please mind, that after listening to this keynote, you might get energized with curiosity, motivation and… paranoia. And you also may want to change your passwords.

Speakers
avatar for Elar Lang

Elar Lang

Estonia, Clarified Security
Elar was a Web Application developer about 8 years before switching to security field in the beginning of 2012. Elar is penetration tester and the main lector and course developer of 4-day Web Application Security training course in Clarified Security.Elar enjoys researching, writing... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 EEST
BlackBox

10:00 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 10:00 - 10:30 EEST
D-Saal

10:00 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 10:00 - 10:30 EEST
Terrassisaal

10:00 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 10:00 - 10:30 EEST
Puupakusaal

10:00 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 10:00 - 10:30 EEST
BlackBox

10:00 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 10:00 - 10:30 EEST
Väike Saal

10:00 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 10:00 - 10:30 EEST
Traforuum

10:30 EEST

AI Is Coming: Test Automation Practice Based on ImageAI
Problem: (Functional/UI) test automation scripts maintenance takes a lot of time and effort.

Introducing ImageAI library. Comparison of test automation framework(Selenium, Sikuli, etc) with ImageAI. Introducing our test automation practice based on ImageAI: How we make a test plan for AI, how we train AI model, how we apply the model to test. Inspire the audience to think about what are the possible scenarios to adopt AI technology to their own work.

Key takeaways:
The audience will take away with the following practical tips:
  • To learn basic knowledge about ImageAI library. 
  • To learn our test automation practice based on ImageAI.
  • To Inspire the audience to think about what are the possible scenarios to adopt AI technology to their own work.

Speakers
avatar for Hua Zhong

Hua Zhong

Development QA team lead at Videobet, Playtech Estonia
Hua is a a certificated Scrum Master (CSM®) and tester (ISTQB®) with 14 years working experience. Currently he works as a team lead and Scrum Master for Videobet, a Playtech company.He is the main architect of the Videobet Continuous Integration automation testing system, as well... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 10:30 - 11:10 EEST
Traforuum

10:30 EEST

Leadership: A Parental Handbook
Believe it or not, leadership and parenting are very similar. I’m not sure if it was while getting my daughter to stop cutting the cat’s whiskers while it slept, or attempting to get a junior team member to engage in learning a new skill that I noticed a crossover in many of the techniques I was using from five years as a parent and 20 years as a leader. However, once I started to pay attention I noticed similarities between parenting and leadership everywhere! It was then that I started to actively apply some parenting techniques to my work life and vice versa in areas such as communication, personnel management, team engagement, and personal mindset. The results were quite positive for my team and my family. Although, I haven't managed to get the family to use a Kanban board yet!

This talk is about my learnings from using leadership techniques with my children and using parenting techniques with my teams. I will share my learnings and stories around the topics of:
  • Growth mindset and how using this can generate grit and determination in a team 
  • Communication from the area of Gentle Parenting and how this can help strengthen understanding with team members 
  • Gamification of tasks which help keep teams focused and engaged, even when the pressure is on.

Key takeaways:
  • Identify how concepts such as growth mindset can be used personally, and within a team to produce positive results 
  • Understand how concepts such as gentle parenting can apply to leadership, and team management
  • Apply ideas from unlikely places to enhance your interactions with your team

Speakers
avatar for Shey Crompton

Shey Crompton

Director, Crompton Consulting
Shey is an independent Software Tester with 20 years experience in many areas of software development. Recently, he has been working with large enterprises in order to help them transform themselves to be more modern, agile, competitive within their industries. When he is not talking... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 10:30 - 11:10 EEST
BlackBox

10:30 EEST

Asynchronous Testing
Main statement: A relay racing competition
When the code you are testing runs asynchronously testing becomes a tricky game of race conditions.
Event sourcing and CQRS have gained popularity over the last few years. Often these are implemented using a distributed messaging system. While this tends to lead to significant architectural advantages the idea of eventual consistency and asynchronous operations massively increases testing complexity.

Our Dev/Tester workshop aims to give attendees practical experience with async code by writing asynchronous tests using rabbitmq as an example messaging system. Come hear more about the pro’s and cons of this type of testing & how we approached this problem.

Key takeaways:
Key learning 1: Dealing with Callbacks, Async/Await & Promises
Key learning 2: Using a testing framework that natively supports asynchronous operations eg: Jest
Key learning 3: Using an environment composition framework allowing testers to easily document and setup-controlled environments e.g.: docker-compose
Key learning 4: Introduction to an async messaging system e.g.: rabbitmq

Speakers
avatar for Blanché Carstens

Blanché Carstens

Senior Software Test Analyst, Allan Gray
Blanché Carstens is a technical tester at Allan Gray. She has over 10 years’ experience in software testing. Her software testing, career started as a result of her curious nature & need to understand projects on a more systematic & technical level. Her passion for testing is fueled... Read More →
avatar for Calvin Moore

Calvin Moore

Allan Gray
Dev by day, tester by night, cyclist by weekend. Calvin is a developer at Allan Gray who has found the value in working closely with testers and getting deeply involved in testing. He has been doing software engineering for 7 years and loved almost every minute of it – even when... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 10:30 - 12:30 EEST
Terrassisaal

10:30 EEST

Generating Useful Date and Time Values for Your Tests Based on the Current Time
Working with dates and times in automated tests can be very difficult. You need to generate dates in different formats, or from different timezones. You need to generate yesterday’s date, or the date of the last day of the current month. How about the date of the previous Monday counting from the current date? In case any of these are something you too need in your tests, this workshop will help you figure out how to generate these cumbersome date and time values.

Staring: Java, LocalDate, LocalTime, LocalDateTime and SimpleDateFormat.

Key takeaways:
  • Using LocalDate, LocalTime, LocalDateTime, and SimpleDateFormat with Java to generate useful date and time values
  • I will show tons of examples of needed dates and how to easily generate them, like: yesterday's or tomorrow's date, the last day of the month, the date of the previous Monday

Speakers
avatar for Corina-Adina Pip

Corina-Adina Pip

QA & Automation Lead, Splend
Corina is a Test & Automation Leading Expert, with focus on testing by means of Java, Selenium, TestNG, Spring, Maven, and other cool frameworks and tools. Previous endeavours from her 10+ years testing career include working on navigation devices and in the online gaming industry... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 10:30 - 12:30 EEST
Väike Saal

10:30 EEST

A Hands-on Introduction to Mobile App Testing
There are more than 2 million apps for Android and iPhones, each. It's very likely that if mobile testing is not already part of your job, it will be in the future. Come to this session to get a jump-start on testing mobile apps. You will learn the elements that make testing mobile apps challenging.

This workshop was designed to be the workshop that I wished I had been able to attend before I started mobile testing. These elements include:
  • Installing test versions of the app on your device (APK and API, oh my!) 
  • Location-based testing and how to fake it Interrupt testing
  • Connectivity Device diversity – how to find out which devices should be tested, and how to find these devices 
  • Using a web proxy to see what’s really going on 
  • Bug writing for mobile – including screenshots, videos, and all the log files that are necessary. 

Bring your laptop and your mobile app. We will be doing some real-world testing.

Key takeaways:
  • Learn the unique challenges and conditions with testing mobile apps, and how to test these. 
  • Hands-on practice with installing and testing apps.
  • A set of tools that will help you be a mobile testing superstar.

Speakers
avatar for John Ruberto

John Ruberto

Senior QA Project Manager, Testlio
John Ruberto takes an engineering approach to building quality into software. He is currently a Senior QA Project Manager at Testlio, where he is helping clients launch better products, faster. John shares his passion for Quality Engineering leadership by speaking at conferences... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 10:30 - 15:30 EEST
Puupakusaal

10:30 EEST

Faster Testing With the Help of Cloud Solutions
Too often teams skip pipeline stages like testing to “quickly” fix an issue in production. By doing so causing new issues. Nowadays the testing stages are often the most time consuming, and therefore seen as the bottleneck. After we have spent time optimizing the build and release stages it is now time for the testing stage! Technologies such as Kubernetes, not only enable us to scale our production environments, it can also significantly speed up your test execution.

In this workshop, we make use of the cloud advantages to optimize your test execution. First, we will learn how to scale your test execution by dividing tests over many worker nodes. Easily spin up 200 chrome browsers and run your end to end tests within minutes instead of hours! Scaling tests is not just a matter of spawning more instances. Just like with applications, tests should also apply to certain design patterns. This is what you will learn in the second part of this workshop.

Key takeaways:
1. How to use Kubernetes
2. How to run your tests at scale
3. How to design a scalable test set
4. The power (and limitations) of scaling

Speakers
avatar for Mark Abrahams

Mark Abrahams

ICT Consultant, Ordina
Mark is working as thought leader for software delivery at Auto|Q Ordina, helping clients (companies) deliver at high speed without compromising quality. Next to these assignments he also leads the Test Automation guild and provides training.


Thursday June 4, 2020 10:30 - 15:30 EEST
D-Saal

11:10 EEST

How I Learned to Like Meetings Again
I have to admit: I hated meetings - I often joined them just to be phased out and sometimes even do work during them; This is a sentence I've heard and said multiple times. Meetings are often a chore, and the different team members don't feel integrated and able to contribute. This changed rapidly when I worked with a team which introduced me to several techniques to improve the way how I could facilitate meetings. Since then, I am using more and more unusual methods of facilitation.

In this talk, I want to take you with me on my journey to better-integrated teams due to an improved meeting culture. I want to show you some of the techniques I've learnt and used in the last two years. I want to elaborate on how I introduced these changes and how it improved the collaboration with my coworkers. The story is yet to be finished and we're still having many typical meetings, but we're on the right way. Nevertheless, besides all the positive impacts, I also wanted to show how it was sometimes much work to convince my team members.

Key takeaways:
  • Getting insights into the pros and cons of using atypical meetings 
  • Some techniques you could use to make your meetings more interesting
  • How we dealt with some of the drawbacks

Speakers
avatar for Sven Kroell

Sven Kroell

Testing Toolsmith, OLX group
Sven is a very passionate tester and coder who loves to create high maintainable testing frameworks and continuous delivery solutions. During the five years of working in the field of testing and test automation, Sven has encountered a lot of common problems with creating test software... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 11:10 - 11:50 EEST
Traforuum

11:10 EEST

Introduction to Testing AWS Solutions
More and more information systems are transferred from on-premises architecture to the cloud, so the need for testing cloud solutions is rising rapidly. The serverless approach covers a vast majority of performance and maintenance factors, but there are many challenges in testing cloud solutions, particularly testing related to the business logic. Considering the fact that Amazon is the world’s biggest cloud provider, in this presentation I will share my experience of testing AWS solutions.

Key takeaways:
I will try to provide answers to the following questions:
  • What are the differences between testing on-premises and cloud solutions? 
  • How can we monitor what is going on in the cloud?
  • What are the ways to automate cloud system testing?

Speakers
avatar for Milovan Pocek

Milovan Pocek

Software Tester, Execom
Milovan Pocek has been a Software Tester at Execom for more than three years. Showing good technical skills, Milovan is highly interested in test automation. He has worked on various software projects and performed system, integration, acceptance, regression and functional testing... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 11:10 - 11:50 EEST
BlackBox

11:50 EEST

10x Tools for 10x Tester
I will do lightning demos on 10 tools that make me more effective in my work in sw development, around planning, collaboration, automation, and testing. I have given the talk twice before, second time was booked by Maaret Pyhäjärvi directly from the audience - which I think is a bigger merit than anything I could say.

Key takeaways:
  • How to be more effective at your work by expanding your tool box 
  • Mindmaps, cucumber, scripting, mob programming, power clipboard, etc etc

Speakers
avatar for Anssi Lehtelä

Anssi Lehtelä

Quality Man, Visma
Anssi is a supporter of individuals and interactions, team work, and more management with less managers. He tests, plans, codes and thinks process - but mainly he just talks to people.


Thursday June 4, 2020 11:50 - 12:30 EEST
BlackBox

11:50 EEST

Contract Testing for Microservices
Do your unit tests always pass but nasty bugs still appear when your microservice gets to production? Here is a new way of testing microservices before deploying them live, using contract testing.

In this talk I will share what is contract testing, what are its benefits and will analyse a tool called PactJS. Showing how to write contract tests in Javascript and providing real life examples based on my experience working with lots of interconnected microservices at Dyson.

Includes a short demo with live coding and some real examples being analysed.

Key takeaways:
  • Learn what contract testing is 
  • Learn how can contract testing be helpful and complement other testing techniques
  • Learn how to get started with contract testing
  • Learn real use cases for contract testing for microservices

Speakers
avatar for Jorge Marín

Jorge Marín

QA Engineer, Dyson
Jorge is an engineer with a strong background on telematics, programming and robotics. Currently holding a role as advanced QA engineer. He started writing algorithms for unmanned aerial vehicles but was dragged to the cloud space. He loves brainstorming, going to conferences and... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 11:50 - 12:30 EEST
Traforuum

12:30 EEST

LUNCH @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 12:30 - 13:30 EEST
D-Saal

12:30 EEST

LUNCH @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 12:30 - 13:30 EEST
Väike Saal

12:30 EEST

LUNCH @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 12:30 - 13:30 EEST
Terrassisaal

12:30 EEST

LUNCH @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 12:30 - 13:30 EEST
BlackBox

12:30 EEST

LUNCH @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 12:30 - 13:30 EEST
Puupakusaal

12:30 EEST

LUNCH @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 12:30 - 13:30 EEST
Traforuum

13:30 EEST

Simplifying Your Test Runs With ‘Make’
The ‘make’ command has been around since 1976 and was originally used to build executable programs. In this talk I want to show how this powerful tool can greatly reduce complexity and eliminate stumbling blocks of running your automated tests. This applies to both CI pipelines and local test runs on developer or QA machines.

Key takeaways:
  • Understand how automation engineers can simplify test runs using ‘make’ 
  • See the benefits of Makefiles for different use cases
  • Realize that “old” technology can be used to solve new problems

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin Bischoff

Benjamin Bischoff

Knowledge Lead - Test Automation, Trivago N.V.
After being a game/application developer and trainer for 15 years, Benjamin decided two and a half years ago to make test automation his main career. Right now he is a Test Automation Engineer and Knowledge Lead in Trivago's core QA team. He focuses on the development and maintenance... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 13:30 - 14:10 EEST
BlackBox

13:30 EEST

Visual Regression Testing. Check Your Pixels!
This workshop examines what visual regression testing actually is, how it works (BackstopJS as an example) and what added value it has. There are some applications that may surprise you! In any case, visual regression tests are worth considering as a supplement to your current test suite!

Practical examples are shown, tips and tricks are given on how to get started, methods of daily use shared and integration with an existing (testing) process is proposed. In the workshop part BackstopJS will be used to execute the learned theory and get a hands on in a sandbox environment (*exact assignments are in development)

Note: This workshop is derived from the initial presentation on this topic. The CFP submit is as a workshop but if desired can also be done as a track presentation.

Max 20 people

Key takeaways:
  • End to End testing not only WITH the GUI but also testing OF the GUI (pixel perfect). 
  • Automate more with with less effort (opposed to Selenium Webdriver implementation).
  • Not only check layout and design, but also content and input/output!

Speakers
avatar for Mehmet Sahingoz

Mehmet Sahingoz

Senior Test Consultant, Triage-IT
Mehmet calls himself ‘a tenacious test automation professional’. He drives and thrives when he and his team embrace each other’s strengths and weaknesses to keep sprinting. Using his skills to distill information vital for the refinement of the product, to detect and prevent... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 13:30 - 15:30 EEST
Väike Saal

13:30 EEST

Will VR Bring a New Focus of Testing?
Almost all our human senses is affected by VR, so it is really hard to test the VR experience with automated tests or AI. A computer will never experience nausea or dizziness as a human being will. How do you effectively test VR from a human perspective?
Have you ever felt the need to do a quick quality assurance of a product or website a side from your regular day by day testing efforts?
Have your team been given an assignment to test a completely new product from scratch within a tight time frame?
Perhaps you want to have a different set of eyes looking at your product?
Do you want other persons in your project to get more involved in your testing?

This workshop session will give you the tools and insight on how you can organize a team, add control to the testing, execute a team test session and create an understandable report to show your results. We will together in smaller groups plan and execute a team test session of a VR headset and create an understandable test report. With combining well known and frequently used techniques in a modern way of testing the latest and most exciting new technology. Work together as team and learn from each other strengths.

Key takeaways:
This workshop session will give you the tools and insight on how you can organize a team, add control to the testing, execute a team test session and create an understandable report to show your results.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Albrecht

Michael Albrecht

Business Coach, AddQ
By successfully implementing agile and exploratory testing in customer projects covering as diverse areas as online gaming and stock exchange programs and as a co-creator of xBTM, Michael has a very good track-record of inspiring testers to take their testing to new levels and to... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 13:30 - 15:30 EEST
Terrassisaal

14:10 EEST

Testing in Production - What It Is, and What It Is Not
The focus of the presentation is the activities known as testing in production. With the increasing speed of deliveries and shorten times from development to production there is a need to understand this concept to be able to take informed risk-based decisions on where and how to test. There is normally a fear of testing in production that is mainly built on misconceptions of what it really entails. I will explain activities that go in under that collective name of grouped under releasing, testing and feedback with a brief overview of pre-prod testing in Continuous and DevOps. The presentation will cover the listed activities with real-life examples of each one:
Canarying, Staged rollout, Dark launching, Dogfooding Monitoring and Logging, as well as testing vs. monitoring, User Feedback Analytics, A/B testing and Beta Testing.

The content is a mix of personal experience, shared experience by colleagues within our continuous team and peers within the testing community and studies.

Key takeaways:
  • What Testing in Production is and what it is not 
  • Why might Testing in Production be needed
  • A set of tools or concepts to add to your testing toolbox

Speakers
avatar for Jan Sahlström

Jan Sahlström

QA Consultant, AddQ Consulting
Jan has almost twenty years of experience in software testing in various roles and is currently working as a consultant for ADDQ in Sweden. His main focus is the QA aspect of transitions in agile and changes when adapting to the DevOps culture. He has done several talks around his... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 14:10 - 14:50 EEST
BlackBox

14:50 EEST

Evolution of Perspectives Along the Life Cycle of a Tester
"There are lots of measures for excellence, but I've found ISO9126 to be the best", is something I wrote in a blog post draft in 2009. I'm glad I never posted that, because since then my worldview has changed quite a bit. I've worked as a tester since 2004 and during these 15 years I've said many things I truly believed in at the time, but now a lot of it seems quite ridiculous or even embarrassing. Some of it has even caused me quite a bit of trouble. But even though I'm not proud of everything I've said, it has given me a unique opportunity to learn how my perspectives on this fine profession we call testing has changed over the years.

For this presentation I've gone through almost 300 blog posts, articles and random scribbles, from which some has been published, some are still waiting their turn as drafts and some are buried to the depths of my hard drives. This data spans over 15 years and gives an interesting storyline with its plot twists and everything to the evolution of perspectives along the life cycle of a tester.

Key takeaways:
This is an educational story on how a mind and values of a tester can change over 15 years of time. Attendees dive into pivotal learning points that steered a testers path to something that boosted his career and well being as a professional. There are also few cautionary tales on what to do and not to do, and what to say and not to say.

Speakers
avatar for Sami Söderblom

Sami Söderblom

QA Lead, SOK, Happy Monkey
Sami is one of Finland's leading experts in context-driven quality practices. He has over fifteen years of history from a variety of testing and quality leadership positions in nearly twenty different business domains. He's a colorful blogger, award winning author of industry publications... Read More →


Thursday June 4, 2020 14:50 - 15:30 EEST
BlackBox

15:30 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Traforuum

15:30 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Väike Saal

15:30 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
D-Saal

15:30 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Terrassisaal

15:30 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Puupakusaal

15:30 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
BlackBox

16:00 EEST

CLOSING KEYNOTE
To be revealed soon

Thursday June 4, 2020 16:00 - 17:00 EEST
BlackBox

17:15 EEST

DINNER & PARTY @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 17:15 - 23:00 EEST
Väike Saal

17:15 EEST

DINNER & PARTY @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 17:15 - 23:00 EEST
BlackBox

17:15 EEST

DINNER & PARTY @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 17:15 - 23:00 EEST
D-Saal

17:15 EEST

DINNER & PARTY @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 17:15 - 23:00 EEST
Traforuum

17:15 EEST

DINNER & PARTY @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 17:15 - 23:00 EEST
Terrassisaal

17:15 EEST

DINNER & PARTY @ COMMON AREA
Thursday June 4, 2020 17:15 - 23:00 EEST
Puupakusaal

19:00 EEST

Lightning Talks
Thursday June 4, 2020 19:00 - 21:00 EEST
Väike Saal

19:00 EEST

Board Games
Thursday June 4, 2020 19:00 - 23:00 EEST
D-Saal

21:00 EEST

Powerpoint Karaoke
Thursday June 4, 2020 21:00 - 23:00 EEST
Väike Saal
 
Friday, June 5
 

09:00 EEST

OPENING KEYNOTE
To be revealed soon

Friday June 5, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 EEST
BlackBox

10:00 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 10:00 - 10:30 EEST
Terrassisaal

10:00 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 10:00 - 10:30 EEST
D-Saal

10:00 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 10:00 - 10:30 EEST
BlackBox

10:00 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 10:00 - 10:30 EEST
Väike Saal

10:00 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 10:00 - 10:30 EEST
Puupakusaal

10:30 EEST

Focusing on People Skills: My Journey into Leadership
There is a big focus in the market on testers learning how to code and becoming more ‘technical’. But what about the other skills that allow us to be successful? Specifically, our people skills. When I started out as a software tester, my main focus was on developing my coding abilities. I watched tutorial after tutorial and constantly pushed myself towards being able to write automated tests. Something didn’t feel right. This didn’t motivate me on its own. My alternative? Alongside improving my technical skills, I was going to work on developing my people skills. Building great software is always about solving people problems. By reading books such as ‘Radical Candor’ and ‘Becoming a Technical Leader’, gathering feedback from managers and colleagues and reflecting on my own behaviours, I was able to progress into a leadership role. I would like to share how I’ve progressed from being a junior tester to a test lead by displaying values such as empathy, honesty and humility, and how you can too.

Key takeaways:
  • Ways to improve your people skills - including reading, gathering feedback and self-reflection.
  • What values to display to your team to gain their trust - including humility, honesty and empathy.
  • How focusing on people skills, alongside tech, can advance your career in testing.

Speakers
avatar for Ali Hill

Ali Hill

QA and Continuous Delivery Consultant, ECS Digital
Ali is a Test Consultant who has recently moved into a leadership and management role. He has always been fascinated by the people side of building great software and enjoys reviewing the processes that people use to do this. Co-organiser of the Ministry of Testing and DevOps Playground... Read More →


Friday June 5, 2020 10:30 - 11:10 EEST
BlackBox

10:30 EEST

Logical Security Tests With Test Automation
Software development is expecting shorter and shorter feedback loops. The appications are deployed more often. There isn't time for security audit. Instead the security must be built in, and tested all the time. Automated security scanners do not understand the application so they can't test the logical issues. How to solve this problem? Normal test automation stack should include tests which are testing the access controls, logic and state management.

During this presentations I show you with examples what kind of security tests the test automation should test and how to do it at API level.

Key takeaways:
  • Understanding why the logical security issues should be part of test automation 
  • List of things which should be normal part of test automation but are usually ignored
  • Test automation should be done from the API level

Speakers
avatar for Teemu Vesala

Teemu Vesala

Senior DevOps Engineer, Blueprint Genetic


Friday June 5, 2020 10:30 - 11:10 EEST
Väike Saal

10:30 EEST

An Introduction to Mob-Programming and How It Affect Quality Assurance. Theory and Hands on Exercises With Lego-Robots.
Mob-programming, what is it and how does it affect testing? “The whole team works on the same thing, at the same time, in the same space, at the same computer.” Can that really be effective? And how does it work for testers? Does ALL members really need to write code? Mob-programming usually create a lot of questions for testers, and this talk will sort out many of these questions.

This session contains of two different parts.
The first part of the workshop will cover mob-programming concepts, drawbacks and benefits. It will be group discussions and sharing of our personal experiences. We will also cover how testing in mob programming projects differs compared to testing in a more traditional projects.
Part 2 will be the section where the participants will get to try the concept of mob-programming. I will act as product owners and divide the participants in to different teams consisting of 3 or 4 people. Each team member will get some information on how to solve the problem. Collaboration and sharing of information within the team will be vital to develop a fully functional LEGO-Robot.

Limit: 35

Prerequisite to a speaker: would be great to have a computer with you, but this programming could be done with phone as well

Key takeaways:
  • Introduction to mob-programming 
  • Real life examples of how you can work with quality in a mob-team
  • Try mobbing in a team to solve a problem and iterate over the solution.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Johansson

Amanda Johansson

Test Consultant, AddQ
Amanda has been working with QA for the last 9 years and is passionate about developing correctly! She mainly works in continuous projects and has always worked to get up and at the same time keep high quality. Amanda does not believe in roles at all instead she strongly works in... Read More →


Friday June 5, 2020 10:30 - 12:30 EEST
D-Saal

10:30 EEST

Craft Your Own Log Filters With Regular Expressions
All to often are testers discouraged or too intimidated to search through huge log files themselves to find the answers, because it seems like a needle in a hay stack. By learning how to use free and commonly available utilities like grep, sort, uniq, and AWK, and how to stitch them together with piping, you can quickly sift through the fluff of huge log files, find rare events. Count occurrences and create your own filtered, specific logs that are updated live.

In this hands-on workshop we will go through some of the very useful features of the utilities and apply them on both huge static logs, and a file that is being added to live, to solve some example problems.

Key takeaways:
  • Learn to filter huge text files, and find/extract what you want from them 
  • Introduction to regular expressions
  • Introduction to batch scripting

Speakers
avatar for Lars Sjödahl

Lars Sjödahl

Lars has been in research and development since 2001. He's technically curious and sees himself as an investigative cartographer of systems, but in recent years he's also developed a fascination for how communication, group psychology, cognitive biases and problem framing influences... Read More →


Friday June 5, 2020 10:30 - 12:30 EEST
Terrassisaal

10:30 EEST

Test Reporting in an Agile Context
It feels like test reporting is no longer a thing in Agile. As long as your team is delivering quality software at a steady pace, you won’t get asked to produce a big test report document. You’re working closely with your team and your stakeholders. It may seem like people don’t care about your testing, but the thing is, they trust you! But it doesn’t mean people don’t want to hear about your testing. In fact, you have a lot more opportunities to report about it. You’re telling people about what you did during stand-up. You reject a commit when you find a serious bug. Maybe you mention that the pipeline is red. And hopefully you talk as you’re pairing with a developer. With your test reporting becoming more diffuse in this way, it may seem less powerful. But it doesn’t have to be.

In this hands-on workshop, we’ll uncover some of the ways you are delivering information about the quality of your software and about how testing is going. We’ll outline who your stakeholders are, what information they care about, and what’s the best way to deliver this information. In short, we’ll explore the many different forms a test report can take, and how you can make them more effective.

Key takeaways:
In an Agile context, test reporting is happening all the time, taking many different shapes and forms.
  • Build an overview of the stakeholders you are already reporting to, and those you should be. 
  • Ideas about how to report to those stakeholders more effectively.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Zagroba

Elizabeth Zagroba

Software Tester, Mendix
Elizabeth tests software at Mendix in Rotterdam. She’s tested web apps, mobile apps, APIs, and content management systems. Since 2011, Elizabeth Zagroba has had a title and a job description that match her natural desire to get to the bottom of things. Her article about mind maps... Read More →
avatar for Joep Schuurkes

Joep Schuurkes

Tech Lead, Mendix
Name: Joep SchuurkesHabitat: RotterdamOccupation: scrum masterFavourite programming language: Perl, but starting to lean towards PythonMother's maiden name: van NiekerkWhat I answer when asked that online: 6mqJZ3


Friday June 5, 2020 10:30 - 15:30 EEST
Puupakusaal

11:10 EEST

Spock: It's Only Logical
The unit testing world has been quite dormant, until Spock arrived. Spock is an open-source framework bridging the gap between the regular unit tests we know and love, and the world of BDD (behaviour driven development), where we write specs of how the system should behave. With its concise syntax, the Groovy framework is becoming an awesome alternative to JUnit. Plus, if you'd like to learn Groovy, using it is a logical step. Want to more on how Spock is different? We'll go deep into its features and see what it brings to the table, on top of the regular tools out there.

Key takeaways:
  • How Groovy helps tests (and code in general) be more readable 
  • Spock simple examples
  • Spock features that JUnit doesn't have

Speakers
avatar for Gil Zilberfeld

Gil Zilberfeld

Agile and Software Coach, TestinGil
Gil Zilberfeld has been in software since childhood, writing BASIC programs on his trusty Sinclair ZX81. With more than twenty years of developing commercial software, he has vast experience in software methodology and practices. Gil has been applying agile principles for product... Read More →


Friday June 5, 2020 11:10 - 11:50 EEST
Väike Saal

11:10 EEST

Test Environments Management with Docker
Why do we automate regression tests? One of the reasons may be to save time in comparison to repetitive manual execution of them. What about automating the process of creation and management of test environments? That’s where Infrastructure as Code concept appears.

During the presentation you will see how Docker may simplify QA’s everyday work and how it can make management of test environments easier.

Plan:
- Introduction to Docker (What is Docker? How it works? How it may make everyday work easier? Functionalities especially useful for QA.)
- Infrastructure as Code
- Docker Compose
- Reusable development and test environments based on Docker Compose

Key takeaways:
  • Setup tests: difficulties 
  • Basic understanding of Docker containers approach
  • Docker-compose: Container orchestration
  • Reusable application environments
  • Test Infrastructure as Code

Speakers
avatar for Tomasz Konieczny

Tomasz Konieczny

Senior QA Enginee, Ro
Tomasz is interested in a wide range of QA related subjects - from test architecture to server setups. Privately Linux user interested in open-source software and generally speaking technology. DevOps and automation enthusiast. Speaker at multiple conferences: TestCon Moscow, Testing... Read More →


Friday June 5, 2020 11:10 - 11:50 EEST
BlackBox

11:50 EEST

Keeping the Big Brother Informed: Verifying Quality When Running a Few Million Events per Day Through an Event Driven Platform on the Cloud
When working on an online casino with operations in several licensed markets we must be confident that our reports to the "Big Brother" ( the regulator authority ) are extremely accurate.

This presentation will explain briefly the problem we need to solve, the serverless solution that my team implemented and the different testing and monitoring techniques that myself as the QA in the team has used in order to assure accuracy.

We will talk about using test automation for exploring the behaviour of a data pipeline, what is the truth when the information that builds the reports is coming from different sources, how do you implement data reconciliation to be able to sleep well and which technical solutions may help you to react quick when you realise that you have lost 55 out of your 5 millions events.

Key takeaways:
  • Learn how to use light test automation to verify serveless solutions setup 
  • Learn how to use monitoring to make sure your data flies through the data pipelines
  • Learn which tools and solutions can help you control idempotency and avoid data loss

Speakers
avatar for Victor Rincon

Victor Rincon

Senior Software Engineer & QA, PAF
Orignally from Spain, Victor moved to Finland in 2005 and is still there! He has tasted a few flavours of Software Development, consultancy, startup life, big corporation and now working on an online casino.Test Automation came across his path about 5 years ago and he had enjoyed... Read More →


Friday June 5, 2020 11:50 - 12:30 EEST
BlackBox

12:30 EEST

LUNCH @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 12:30 - 13:30 EEST
Puupakusaal

12:30 EEST

LUNCH @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 12:30 - 13:30 EEST
Väike Saal

12:30 EEST

LUNCH @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 12:30 - 13:30 EEST
Terrassisaal

12:30 EEST

LUNCH @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 12:30 - 13:30 EEST
D-Saal

12:30 EEST

LUNCH @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 12:30 - 13:30 EEST
BlackBox

13:30 EEST

5 phases of API test automation
In my context we run a micro service architecture with a number (300+) of API endpoints both synchronous and asynchronous. Testing these in a shared environment with cross dependencies is both challenging and very necessary to make sure this distributed monolith operates correctly. Traditionally we would test by invoking an endpoint with the relevant query params or payload and then assert the response code or body for valid data / type definitions. This proved to be more and challenging as the push for CI and having common data sources meant dependencies would go up and down per deployment which meant flaky tests.

I will demonstrate how we leveraged of newer technologies and split our API testing into 5 levels to increase our overall confidence. The levels are (ignoring developer focused unit and unit integration tests):
  1. Mocked black box testing - where you start up an API (docker image) identical version to the one that would go to PROD but mock out all its surrounding dependencies. This gives you freedom for any known data permutations and one can simulate network or failure states of those dependencies.
  2. Temporary name-spaced API in your CI environment - here you start up API. As it would in a normal integrated environment, but it’s in a temp space that can be completed destroyed if tests fail… never gets to the deploy stage and no need to roll back if errors/failures occur, here we use kubernetes and CI config to orchestrate these tests. The tests focus is to check 80-20 functionality and confirm that the API will meet all the acceptance criteria.
  3. Post deployment tests - usually called smoke testing to verify that an API is up and critical functionality is working in a fully integrated environment.We should be happy by now right? Fairly happy that API does what it says on the box… but wait there is more...
  4. Environment stability tests - tests that run every few min in an integrated environment and makes sure all services are highly available given the deployments that have completed successfully. Here we use Gitlab to control the scheduling.
  5. Data explorer tests - these are tests that run periodically but use some randomization to either generate or extract random data with which to invoke the API with. These sort of tests are crucial for finding those edge cases that are usually missed. Sometimes of low occurrence but generally high risk issues. I wrote a custom data extractor that runs against our DBs to find strange data sets to use as tests data.
I would like to elaborate and demonstrate these layers and execution and how this has changes the way we test and look at APIs. Would also touch on the tooling we use to achieve this and the pros/cons of using this approach.

Speakers
avatar for Shekhar Ramphal

Shekhar Ramphal

Quality assurance technical lead, Allan Gray
Shekhar is passionate about software testing, Computer engineer by qualification. He has experience in full stack testing in all areas from manual QA, system design and architecture, to Performance and security as well as automation in different languages.


Friday June 5, 2020 13:30 - 14:10 EEST
BlackBox
  Track

13:30 EEST

Verifying Relationships: Consumer-Driven Contract Tests and Microservices
Microservice architecture brings many benefits but there is one potential pitfall when testing them. How do you model and test the many relationships between services? You could try integration tests but they are expensive to maintain, slow to run and come with orchestration complications. Contract testing could help with this. But the traditional contract test has a circular problem. The team writing the service defines the contract and the test. As soon as this isn’t kept up to date (only a matter of time) the test is useless. A better approach is Consumer-Driven Contract testing. Here we use the output of contract tests owned by your consumers to test your API.

This talk will introduce you to the Pact framework to write these tests and the key concepts. You will be able to avoid that integration test pack and have more time for other test activities in your team.

Key takeaways:
  • Learn why Consumer-Driven Contract Testing can be preferable to integration testing.
  • Understand the difference between the traditional Contract Test and Consumer-Driven Contract tests.
  • Get an introduction to the Pact.io framework used for creating Consumer-Driven Contract tests.
  • Hear some real-world examples of where these style of tests have helped and hindered a project.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Shipley

Thomas Shipley

Senior QA Consultant, Equal Experts
Thomas Shipley is a contract QA in London currently working with EE. He has experience across many different industries including gaming, retail and big data companies including Microsoft, Just Eat, Datasift and John Lewis. His primary focuses are automated non-functional testing... Read More →


Friday June 5, 2020 13:30 - 14:10 EEST
Väike Saal

13:30 EEST

A Tester’s Guide to Unit Testing
We talk a lot about the testing triangle and how we need to focus more on the lower level unit and component tests for most of our coverage. However, in my experience unit tests and how to effectively write them remains a mystery for many testers and in this workshop I want to unlock the idea behind unit tests, how to write them in an effective way that ensures a high coverage, mitigates the need for too many higher integration tests and most importantly, makes them easy to read and contribute to for testers.

In this talk I want to share my experience as both a developer and a tester in highlighting the mind-sets of both and how through collaboration between developers and testers, software quality can be greatly improved through effective unit testing.
The talk will discuss the different unit testing approaches, provide tips on how to write unit tests in a simple way and cover things like mocking and coverage analysis to improve coverage and scope of unit tests. The workshop will be mostly technical, but also include a few soft skill tips to aid the communication and provide testers with more confidence to help change the unit testing culture in their teams. As someone who has filled the role of both developer and tester, I understand both viewpoints on unit testing. In this workshop would like to share my experience on how having a better understanding of unit tests can enhance a testers ability to test more effectively and contribute in helping catch defects earlier while reducing the load on the tester at the end of any development cycle.

This workshop will require testers to bring their own laptops, connect to Github and do some basic coding as they learn how to write unit tests and use this to better their testing elsewhere.

Limit: 30-40 people

Key takeaways:
  • Understanding the importance of unit testing 
  • Understanding of best practices in writing unit tests to improve coverage and maintainability
  • Actual unit test coding experience

Speakers
avatar for Craig Risi

Craig Risi

Software Architect, Allan Gray
Craig is a man of many talents, but no sense how to use them. He could be out changing the world, but would prefer to make software instead. He has a passion for software design, but more importantly software quality and designing systems that can achieve this in a technically diverse... Read More →


Friday June 5, 2020 13:30 - 15:30 EEST
D-Saal

13:30 EEST

Will VR Bring a New Focus of Testing?
Almost all our human senses is affected by VR, so it is really hard to test the VR experience with automated tests or AI. A computer will never experience nausea or dizziness as a human being will. How do you effectively test VR from a human perspective?
Have you ever felt the need to do a quick quality assurance of a product or website a side from your regular day by day testing efforts?
Have your team been given an assignment to test a completely new product from scratch within a tight time frame?
Perhaps you want to have a different set of eyes looking at your product?
Do you want other persons in your project to get more involved in your testing?

This workshop session will give you the tools and insight on how you can organize a team, add control to the testing, execute a team test session and create an understandable report to show your results. We will together in smaller groups plan and execute a team test session of a VR headset and create an understandable test report. With combining well known and frequently used techniques in a modern way of testing the latest and most exciting new technology. Work together as team and learn from each other strengths.

Key takeaways:
This workshop session will give you the tools and insight on how you can organize a team, add control to the testing, execute a team test session and create an understandable report to show your results.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Albrecht

Michael Albrecht

Business Coach, AddQ
By successfully implementing agile and exploratory testing in customer projects covering as diverse areas as online gaming and stock exchange programs and as a co-creator of xBTM, Michael has a very good track-record of inspiring testers to take their testing to new levels and to... Read More →


Friday June 5, 2020 13:30 - 15:30 EEST
Terrassisaal

14:10 EEST

A Fundamental Cookbook for Testing (With) Hardware
Rarely, we think about what happens when we swipe a credit card? What happens when we tell our favorite assistant to turn down the room temperature? How do we obtain results of our blood test? Does my low fat yogurt really have 0.2% of fat? Today, a general image about the software is all about the ‘apps’ on a mobile phone, social network apps, cloud storage for our images, web browsers able to access all mighty Internet, and so on. So, if everything is online or in the cloud, why should we pay any attention to the hardware? And yet, in order to find out all the important answers for the questions above, we need to interact with some sort of hardware. And why testing of this kind of software is different?

Here, testers swiftly learn that lines between testing the software, testing the hardware and interactions between those are blurred. Often, the only right way to test the software is to test it together with the hardware itself and communication between them. But, what to do when hardware is not available or incomplete? Or hardware development is late? Or we do not have access to third party systems? To add even more to that, various compatibility requirements present another challenge requiring our attention. Embracing the fact how challenging these environments tend to be has helped me learn about approaches for making development process more productive, making more creative environment and deliver more reliable products to market.

Let’s learn about main challenges when testing (with) hardware! Let’s learn about concepts for overcoming them! Concepts such as testability, (testing) logs, emulators, compatibility, portability, etc. Applying those concepts correctly will help you succeed and thrive as a tester in this context!

Key takeaways:
  • Learn about important quality aspects in regards testing (with) hardware, such as testability, connectivity, compatibility, etc 
  • Learn about the unique set of challenges testers might expect when testing (with) hardware
  • Learn about concepts and experiments that might be applied with the goal to overcome those challenges

Speakers
avatar for Uros Stanisic

Uros Stanisic

Head of Testing, Execom
Uros have been testing, leading, managing and coaching for 15 years. He has been involved in number of international projects so far.His interests lie in process improvement and productivity. Also, he is passionate about spreading the knowledge between fellow colleagues and community... Read More →


Friday June 5, 2020 14:10 - 14:50 EEST
Väike Saal

14:10 EEST

From Rags to Riches: Turning Your Mobile Test Automation Into a Cinderella Story
In the era of DevOps and continuous deployment, more and more organisations are demanding a move from lengthy release cycles to shorter deployments - occurring weekly and sometimes even daily. To accomplish this, test automation is not only required, but is now an integral piece of the continuous integration pipeline. This is a vast contrast from how test automation was viewed not very long ago. In the past, teams treated test automation as a side project - a stepchild like Cinderella. But with its newly discovered importance, test automation is now the “belle of the ball”. So, how does this change how we develop test automation?

In this talk, Niranjani will share her experiences driving test automation from rags to riches at companies such as Lyft and Pinterest. She’ll discuss the practices of building a team and culture to support test automation, as well as failures and mishaps that they endured. She’ll also share the lessons learned of how to prepare tests and infrastructure for this new and richer lifestyle of being a part of CI/CD.

Join Niranjani on this magical journey to transform your test automation from rags to riches. You’ll learn how to dress up your test automation with design patterns that improve CI efficiency, and embark on a whimsical coach ride by wrapping your tests in containers to simplify your build process.

Key takeaways:
As part of my talk, I will be sharing the following:
  • Live coding of best design patterns to adhere to while developing a test framework 
  • Case Study with challenges and solutions based on my experience
  • How to go about inducing a testing culture at startups

Speakers
avatar for Niranjani Manoharan

Niranjani Manoharan

Senior Software Engineer in Test, Lyft
Niranjani is an enthusiastic engineer who is passionate about writing code to break applications!


Friday June 5, 2020 14:10 - 14:50 EEST
BlackBox

14:50 EEST

A Call to Action: What Your CEO Wishes You Knew
I set out to answer the question "How can test teams be more relevant to the business?" by interviewing CEOs, CTOs and VPs of tech companies for over 20 hours. What I got from these conversations was a mix of compelling, empowering and sad in equal measure. I wanted to know how we could change our messaging, our work and our mission to be considered a valuable voice in the boardroom. I had incredible, open conversations with companies that got rid of all dedicated testers years ago, companies that have large test teams, and many that fall somewhere in the middle. What I got from these conversations should be considered a call to action for ALL testers.

I will tell audiences the 5 things that EVERY CEO said and the cautionary tale of the team that no longer exists.

Key takeaways:
  • The 5 things every CEO/CTO/VP said 
  • What matters to decision makers and how to communicate it 
  • How to develop a test team that is seen a necessary to the success of the business
  • Lessons from the team that no longer exists

Speakers
avatar for Meaghan Thompson

Meaghan Thompson

QA Manager, atVenu
Meaghan is a QA Manager in Canada, where she lives with her partner, Trevor, 3 kids and two frogs. She is passionate about leadership, specifically growing a test team that is ready to weather the storms and adapt to testing in the new world of Continuous Deployment and self-testing... Read More →


Friday June 5, 2020 14:50 - 15:30 EEST
BlackBox

14:50 EEST

Impact of Agile Learning for Testers
Many companies apply a rather classical learning approach. A team-lead is going to talk with each team-member - e.g. developers or testers- about the planned achievements of the next year. Together they have a look at a priorly evaluated catalog of trainings and decide what kind of training the team-member is going to participate in. This approach supports the team-leads in supporting their team members as well as in planning competences throughout the team. But what kind of impact does this kind of learning have on the team-member itself - the team - the company or even the industry? What happens, if the learner has the free choice to decide what he or she likes to learn? How could this, perhaps even combined with a learner supporting role, change the impact development team members have? What does this role, what we call the agile learning coach, exactly do?

In this talk I will talk about how different kind of trainings could lead not only to different learning outcomes but also might influence the impact of a development team.

Key takeaways:
More information about why we learn in organisations like we learn today and what a more agile approach could look like. Also what is impact to learning and how could that change with different learning and teaching methods.

Speakers
avatar for Vera Gehlen-Baum

Vera Gehlen-Baum

Managing Director, QualityMinds
Vera is a learning consultant. She tries to improve the learning process, especially for testers, for a couple of years now. Therefore she takes a closer look on how people learn and what kind of scientifically proven methods would help them with their individual learning. To get... Read More →


Friday June 5, 2020 14:50 - 15:30 EEST
Väike Saal

15:30 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
BlackBox

15:30 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Väike Saal

15:30 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
D-Saal

15:30 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Terrassisaal

15:30 EEST

COFFEE BREAK @ COMMON AREA
Friday June 5, 2020 15:30 - 16:00 EEST
Puupakusaal

16:00 EEST

CLOSING KEYNOTE
To be revealed soon

Friday June 5, 2020 16:00 - 17:00 EEST
BlackBox
 

Twitter Feed